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China’s reform of supervision system to eliminate dead zone: People's Daily


Alwihda Info | Par peoplesdaily - 11 Novembre 2016

The reform came about as new supervision challenges have emerged with the country’s rapid economic development, the article said, adding that the recent vote-buying scandal in Liaoning province exposed that election fraud is new ground for administrative supervision.


People's Daily

The recent pilot plan for reforming the supervision system released by the Chinese authorities can be regarded as a major top-level design and political reform that will have nationwide influence, People's Daily praised in an editorial published on Thursday.
According to a statement from the general offices of the Communist Party of China (CPC) Central Committee on Monday, Chinese authorities will conduct a pilot program in Beijing and the provinces of Shanxi and Zhejiang as part of efforts to make the current supervision system more authoritative and efficient.
The reform of the current supervision system will accelerate the formation of a cleaner Party and government and will better combat corruption by increasing the coverage and means of supervision as well as establishing a centralized, authoritative and effective system, the paper said.
The article noted that in the current system, the discipline inspection commissions mainly take charge of party management while the supervisory commissions are generally responsible for administrative supervision and law-based administration, leaving some dead zones in need of further improvement.
China’s existing administrative supervision laws mainly deal with administrative organizations, civil servants, and personnel appointed by these organizations, but fail to reach the legislative bodies, judiciary authorities, State-owned enterprises, public institutions and social organizations, the editorial elaborated.
A lack of independence, imperfect supervision procedures and limited means of supervision also confine the capability of the supervisory organizations, it further analyzed.
The reform came about as new supervision challenges have emerged with the country’s rapid economic development, the article said, adding that the recent vote-buying scandal in Liaoning province exposed that election fraud is new ground for administrative supervision.
Hong Kong SAR and some Western countries have placed emphasis on the supervision of both state organs and the private sector and pay more attention to constitutional enforcement and the protection of civil rights, all of which could serve as reference for China.
The planned comprehensive supervisory body will, in a more systematic and coordinated manner, oversee all state organs and civil servants. By playing a bigger role in constitutional enforcement and the protection of civil rights, the reform of the supervision system could also enlighten China’s innovation in other systems, the paper concluded.